If you know me at all, you know that I love a challenge. In fact, they make my heart go pitter-pat.

But when I heard that my first challenge as an Island Batik ambassador was “Magnificent Minis,” I breathed a sigh of relief. Easy peasy!

Island Batik Ambassadors Magnificent Minis

You see, February has already been quite a busy month. Between blog hopping and learning to make videos and all the plain old “mom” stuff, a mini sounded like the perfect (quick) way to kick off my ambassadorship!

So of course, I opted for foundation paper piecing.

via GIPHY

Let’s just say that although I do know how to paper piece, it’s not my strength.

I kept it simple. I decided to go with a Valentine’s Day theme, even though I don’t really celebrate it, mainly because hearts are pretty easy to paper piece. It’s timely. It works.

I worked up a design in EQ8, printed it out, and was off to the races.

I chose several strips of pinks and purples from Stash Builders to put against a background of the neutral yardage that Island Batik included in the Big Box o’ Goodies that they sent out last month.

Foundation Paper Piecing Tools I Can’t Live Without:

If you don’t know how to paper piece, or need a refresher, BluPrint (formerly Craftsy) offers classes, plus there are plenty of free videos available on YouTube. If you prefer learning from books, here’s a good one to start with.

My first paper piecing project was a set of mug rugs. That experience persuaded me to take a class at a local shop, which I never regret. Still, I paper piece so infrequently that I always start with the simplest blocks to warm up and refresh my memory. The strategy worked…at first.

Pitter-Pat easy blocks

After that, the seam ripper came out as I made silly mistake after silly mistake (okay, like four times I had to use the seam ripper). I even vented my frustration in an Instagram story.

Eventually, I had a pieced top in a much subtler and more traditional look than I’m typically known for–but I really liked it. I layered the top with a leftover piece of Hobbs 80/20 from an earlier project (so I didn’t have to cut into any of the new batts that they sent, woo-hoo!) and found that I already had several shades of Aurifil 50wt thread in my stash that would work.

Pitter-Pat Aurifil
(L-R) 3660, 2000, 3840

Inspired after flipping through my favorite book about walking foot quilting, I zigged and zagged back and forth across the top, alternating lines of color. When I finished, the quilting reminded me of an EKG (a very, very irregular one), which I thought was perfect for a heart quilt. And Pitter-Pat became the name of the quilt.

Pitter-Pat
“Pitter-Pat”, 18″ x 24″, by Becca Fenstermaker of Pretty Piney Quilts

I loved my first challenge with Island Batik fabrics, and I’m thankful for the opportunity to work with the Island Batik team, partners, and ambassadors for the rest of 2019!

PS–Although I didn’t get a chance to use my new AccuQuilt Go! cutter for this project, I’ll be using it for the March challenge. I had a blast creating a little video to show all the fun stuff that was in the Ready! Set! Go! box that came with all of the Island Batik fabrics!

Pitter-Pat: Magnificent Mini Quilt

13 Replies to “Pitter-Pat: Magnificent Mini Quilt

    1. Thanks, Yvonne! I did have to walk away from it for a bit and get back to it with a fresh brain. Sometimes that’s just how it goes!

  1. I hate when that happens – but you wouldn’t know from the quilt that you had any trouble. I had some simlar stuff on one I’m working on today…no one else will know. Plenty of time to get to that accuquilt! I have been trying to use my other one a bit more, and boy do I love it when I can.

  2. One of the joys of paper piecing is cutting off that seam allowance…or sewing the wrong fabric in the little piece in the middle!!! Every time I paper piece I use my seam ripper!! Your quilt turned out just lovely and I’m looking forward to seeing what you create next month!!

  3. Looking at the hearts, and those lovely fabrics, no-one would know about any problems at all. Thanks good ness for those seam rippers, and tiny scissors, The threads, you have chosen lovely shades.

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